A particular history of the brain

Neuromatic | John Lardas Modern | Photo: Jonathan VanAntwerpen

“In the MRI, flat on my back, questions arose. How to write a particular history of the brain that would capture the reverberating intimacies and the cognitive claustrophobia — all that was going into the relation of power that I was experiencing? How to convey, let alone explain, the blinkered feeling that I might not be human? How to tell stories — and stories within stories — about the people, practices, propositions, and beliefs that have made the brain such a familiar image and pressing force in the world? In the MRI, the writerly challenge began to take shape.”

from John Lardas Modern’s Neuromatic: or, A Particular History of Religion and the Brain (The University of Chicago Press, 2021)

--

--

--

Jonathan VanAntwerpen is a program director at the Henry Luce Foundation. Originally trained as a philosopher, he holds a Ph.D. in sociology from UC-Berkeley.

Love podcasts or audiobooks? Learn on the go with our new app.

Recommended from Medium

Breaking the Paradigm, One Statue at a Time

The Twilight Zone Slayer

How do you leave a warning that lasts as long as nuclear waste?

Holocaust Memorial Day

“Individual autonomy does not repeat in history.” Dr. Adam Tabriz

Consuming Asiatown Introduction

Captured in Time: 8-Year-Old Percy Hemingway upon Arrival in America in 1890

Operation Eiche: The Rescue of Benito Mussulini

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Jonathan VanAntwerpen

Jonathan VanAntwerpen

Jonathan VanAntwerpen is a program director at the Henry Luce Foundation. Originally trained as a philosopher, he holds a Ph.D. in sociology from UC-Berkeley.

More from Medium

Sensing Space in Meditation

Fermi Paradox: Where are the aliens?

Alien life: “Lefty” Hooligan, “What’s Left?”, December 2021